African Traditions, Military Pomp For Mandela Burial

Many optimistic despite Mandela’s passing

epa03987545 An aerial photo made available 12 December 2013 by the Metropolitan Police shows the skyscrapers looming out of the foggy mist over London 11 December 2013.  They were taken from a police helicopter.  EPA/MPS IN THE SKY  HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES

Former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad pays his respects to former South African President Nelson Mandela as Mandela lies in state for the second day at the Union Buildings in Pretoria December 12, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Markus Schreiber/Pool JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) – Nelson Mandela will be laid to rest on Sunday in an elaborate ceremony combining a state funeral and all its military pomp with the traditional burial rituals of his Xhosa clan to ensure he has an easy transition into the afterworld. Many South Africans will revere Mandela, who during his life became a global symbol of peace and reconciliation, even more now that he has died, since ancestors are widely believed to have a guiding, protective role over the living. Around 46 percent of the population practices traditional African religions, according to a 2010 survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, a Washington-based research center.
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Former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad pays his respects to former South African President Nelson Mandela as Mandela lies in state for the second day at the Union Buildings in Pretoria December 12, 2013. REUTERS/Markus Schreiber/Pool

“I never saw him with my own eyes until today, and it was to say farewell.” Mr. Mandela, who died on Thursday at 95 years of age , spent nearly three decades in jail for opposing South Africa’s formerly white-minority regime. He is lauded among blacks and whites for ushering in an era of peace and racial reconciliation. After winning South Africa’s first multiracial elections in 1994, he was sworn in under the same rotunda in the Union Buildings where he will lie in state each day through Friday. The space was renamed on Wednesday in his honor.
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Mandela Lying in State in Pretoria

Fake Mandela service interpreters firm has vanished Steven Mufson S. African official says the man came from school for the deaf but admits his English was inadequate. Irans business community awaits signs of progress Jason Rezaian Rouhanis budget is cautiously optimistic as the nuclear deal is set to ease sanctions, release some assets. Steven Mufson Advocates for the deaf say the still-unidentified man was waving his arms, not using sign language. These are the profiles and thoughts of some of the mourners who waited in tremendously long lines to see their anti-apartheid hero. ___ AKUM JULIUS ACHEM, a quality controller at a company that builds boilers and other equipment, is hoping there is little change in the country he has lived in for 10 years. But the Cameroonian worries about South Africans rejecting Africans from other countries who come here seeking work. There are a lot of rumors that after death of Madiba (Mandelas clan name) a lot of things are going to change. But for the past 20 years South Africa has been becoming more mature in in its democracy, so I dont foresee changes. There is still a lot of hurtness in the black community, as I can see, you can see the grievances. But the majority are seeking education. When people are educated, they really know what is a brother or a sister from another country. Education is the main thing. The more education South Africans get, the more they will behave.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit <a href='http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/africa/many-optimistic-despite-Mandelas-passing/2013/12/12/fdb420fa-634e-11e3-af0d-4bb80d704888_story.html’ >http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/africa/many-optimistic-despite-mandela

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