Nelson Mandela Dies At 95

Nelson Mandela, anti-apartheid icon and father of modern South Africa, dies

<img src='http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/121211033126-Mandela-gallery-08–horizontal-gallery.jpg’ width=’200px’ alt=’Mandela and Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda arrive at an ANC rally on March 3, 1990, in Lusaka, Zambia. Mandela was elected president of the ANC the next year.’ style=’float:left;padding:5px’ />

After a two-day nationwide strike was crushed by police, he and a small group of ANC colleagues decided on military action and Mandela pushed to form the movement’s guerrilla wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe, or Spear of the Nation. He was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to five years’ hard labor for leaving the country illegally and inciting blacks to strike. A year later, police uncovered the ANC’s underground headquarters on a farm near Johannesburg and seized documents outlining plans for a guerrilla campaign. At a time when African colonies were one by one becoming independent states, Mandela and seven co-defendants were sentenced to life in prison. [+] Enlarge Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images Nelson Mandela made a statement about reconciliation by wearing a Springboks jersey and congratulating captain Francois Pienaar after the team won the 1995 Rugby World Cup. “I do not deny that I planned sabotage,” he told the court. “I did not plan it in a spirit of recklessness, nor because I have any love of violence. I planned it as a result of a calm and sober assessment of the political situation that had arisen after years of tyranny, exploitation and oppression of my people by whites.” The ANC’s armed wing was later involved in a series of high-profile bombings that killed civilians, and many in the white minority viewed the imprisoned Mandela as a terrorist. Up until 2008, when President George W. Bush rescinded the order, he could not visit the U.S. without a waiver from the secretary of state certifying he was not a terrorist. From the late 1960s South Africa gradually became an international pariah, expelled from the U.N., banned from the Olympics. In 1973 Mandela refused a government offer of release on condition he agree to confine himself to his native Transkei.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit <a href='http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/9434797/nelson-Mandela-dies-95-anti-apartheid-icon-brokered-2010-world-cup’ >http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/9434797/nelson-mandela-dies-95-anti-apartheid-icon-brokered-2010-world-cup

Nelson Mandela, anti-apartheid icon and father of modern South Africa, dies

Mandela and Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda arrive at an ANC rally on March 3, 1990, in Lusaka, Zambia. Mandela was elected president of the ANC the next year.

Four years after his release, in South Africa’s first multiracial elections, he became the nation’s first black president. “The day he was inducted as president, we stood on the terraces of the Union Building,” de Klerk remembered years later. “He took my hand and lifted it up.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/05/world/africa/nelson-mandela/index.html

Nelson Mandela‘s death: Live Report

Bush for launching the 2003 war against Iraq, and accused the United States of “wanting to plunge the world into a Holocaust.” And as he was acclaimed as the force behind ending apartheid, he made it clear he was only one of many who helped transform South Africa into a democracy. In 2004, a few weeks before he turned 86, he announced his retirement from public life to spend more time with his loved ones.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/05/world/africa/nelson-mandela-duplicate-2/index.html

This picture taken on July 18, 2003 shows Nelson Mandela

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