Naomie Harris Interview: ‘winnie Mandela Terrified Me’

Idris Elba and Naomie Harris in Mandela: the Long Walk to Freedom

Mum never wanted me to go to Cambridge. I always put incredible pressure on myself in terms of achieving, so she wanted me to go somewhere less work-oriented, where Id have more fun. But I said: I want the pressure. She laughs. In hindsight, my mum was right. But going to Cambridge is one of the things Im most proud of. In this industry, its difficult to be taken seriously as a woman and that really helps. A lack of decent womens roles have had far more bearing on her career choices than any racism, which she claims never to have experienced. READ: The making of Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom Obviously there are roles that [as a black woman] I just havent been put up for, like in Downton Abbey , but really the film industrys progress in terms of race has been extraordinary. Harris has been a pioneer in changing womens roles, not least in transforming the traditional simpering Bond girl into a gun-toting Bond woman, as she insists shes called. In 2014, shooting begins on the franchises 24th film, where shell play a 21st-century Miss Moneypenny. I dont know anything about the script, which is great, because I cant reveal anything, she grins. INTERVIEW: Naomie Harris, RIP the Bond Girl Harris never discusses her personal life, but shes laying foundations for a more settled existence. Recently, I rented a little cottage in Hertfordshire for six months; I could have stayed there for the rest of my life. My brother and sister are much younger than me, so I grew up an only child and Im happy in my own company.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/film/10535434/Naomie-Harris-interview-Winnie-Mandela-terrified-me.html

Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom: Film review – a moving but very uneven journey

When I’m offered my OBE – and it’s ‘when’ not ‘if’ – I’ll grab it with both hands

Pictures’ and Spyglass Entertainment’s ‘Invictus’ at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Theater on December 3, 2009 in Beverly Hills, California. (Kevin Winter, Getty Images) Actor Morgan Freeman and former U.S. President Bill Clinton will celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela at a tribute concert in New York next month. Actor Morgan Freeman and former U.S. President Bill Clinton will celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela at a tribute concert in New York next month. The Hollywood veteran, who portrayed the ex-South African leader in 2009 movie Invictus, will recite speeches from Mandela’s early political career as he fought against racial segregation, and letters to his wife, Winnie, which the late icon wrote during his incarceration at Robben Island prison, to mark the 20th anniversary of the end of apartheid. Freeman will also read the civil rights hero’s famous inaugural address following his election victory in 1994, while Clinton will also be on hand to honour Mandela’s legacy.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.4utah.com/story/morgan-freeman-to-recite-mandela-speeches-at-conce/d/story/-OzF1pXe-kOKH3X7gJCECQ

Morgan Freeman to recite Mandela speeches at concert

Long Walk to Freedom begins very movingly with Mandela (Idris Elba) describing in voice-over a recurring dream he has of his happy childhood home. Like the elderly professor in Ingmar Bergman’s Wild Strawberries, he is conjuring up memories of a time long gone when “the child ran free.” British screenwriter William Nicholson (who also wrote Shadowlands) attempts throughout to balance the sweeping historical drama with an intimate study of a man who suffered acute emotional loss. Arguably, the strongest part of the film is that dealing with Mandela’s marriage to Winnie (the excellent Naomie Harris). When they first meet, he rhapsodises over her beauty. He is utterly devoted to her. The film-makers don’t skimp from showing how the marriage disintegrated during Mandela’s captivity. Whereas he was eventually prepared to negotiate with the white apartheid Government, she felt an utter hatred for them and an understandable determination to use violence to bring it down.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/reviews/mandela-long-walk-to-freedom-film-review–a-moving-but-very-uneven-journey-9035513.html

Nelson Mandela on life support

Daughter Zindzi Mandela, right, receives a hug from an unidentified woman, left, as she arrives at the Mediclinic Heart Hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela is being treated in Pretoria, South Africa, Wednesday, June 26, 2013.

South Africans were torn on Wednesday between the desire not to lose a critically ill Nelson Mandela

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